wellness-obsession jennifer dene

Perhaps you’re overcomplicating this health thing?

The Los Angeles wellness obsession has gone bonkers.

This isn’t new information— I live in a city where people pay thousands of dollars to have their fat frozen and spend a week’s take-home wage on juice cleansing — but it’s gotten out of control.

The straw that has broken this camel’s back came last night when I popped into the supermarket. As I quickly dashed about filling my basket with veg, milk and eggs, my inquisitive-journalist ears picked up the sounds of a conversation that would only take place in a city like L.A.

Following the treble tones, I turned into the aisle to find two women having an anxious and in-depth conversation about which brand of water they should buy.

I kid you not.

It went like this:

“This one is reverse osmosis”, says the brunette wearing a red neckerchief and holding a $6.99 bottle of H20.

“But this one has added electrolytes,” counters the blonde, pointing her manicured fingers at a label that has flown halfway across the world to sit on this mid-Wilshire shelf.

“Perhaps we should buy the glass bottles?” suggests the first. “To avoid BPAs.”

“Sure, that works…just make sure you read the nutrition label,” replies the second, a little more quietly as she catches me watching, transfixed.

I tear my eyes away, stash a few (home-brand) club sodas into my basket and head to the self service checkout, trying not to giggle at the scene I just observed.

Read the nutrition label on your water? Now that’s a new one!

Look, I’m not scoffing at these women’s determination to hydrate — drinking clean water is very, very important. And if you have the luxury of being able to afford the brand that is alkalized, charcoal-filtered or lovingly bottled at a cold mountain spring, and drinking that type of water floats your boat, then power to you.

But the reality is that it’s totally unnecessary to take a simple health habit — drink more water — and make it something complicated, and frankly a little bourgeoisie. Honestly, do YOU have the time or mental bandwidth to deliberate the pros and cons of various water brands? I sure as heck don’t!

As your wellness coach I suggest that you spend more time drinking water and less time worrying about the ideal way to do it. (Insider tip: the tap turns to the left.)

This goes for any new healthy habit…the easiest way to make progress is by simply starting.

Want to get fit? Lace up your sneakers and walk around your neighborhood.

Want to eat healthier? Load up your basket with fruit, veg and whole grains, and stop buying brightly colored boxes plastered with words like “healthy!” and “fiber!”. (These words are often there to disguise the whopping amount of sugar, sodium or trans-fats that the product contains.)

I know that I’ve talked about this before, but I will continue to beat the drum until we all get the message that being healthy is actually very simple.

The healthiest people that I know are not the ones who agonize over every last detail to make the perfect choice. They don’t obsess over what they eat, how they move, or what they weigh. They don’t trap themselves into rigid lifestyle habits or overload their days with unrealistic goals and expectations. And they certainly don’t spend Sunday evening in the supermarket, analyzing the merits of drinking water.

So your goal for this week is to commit to becoming one of the healthy ones.

You can do that in three steps:

  1. Pinpoint an area of your life that is being held back by perfectionism, analysis-paralysis or straight up laziness.
  2. Set an intention to change one single habit related to that area.
  3. Take swift action, today, tomorrow, the next day, and so on; improve as you go, and know that each day you choose to do something different is the day that your life will change.

As always, let me know how it goes…

 

With love,

healthy evening habits

5 Things To Do Tonight (And Enjoy Tomorrow Even More)

Do you jump out of bed at the buzz of the alarm?

Or are you more closely acquainted with SNOOZE than the first rays of sunshine?

Personally I’ve never been one to stick my head under the pillow. I compare waking up to ripping off a Bandaid — if you’ve got to get it done, you might as well just do it.

(But that might just be the country girl in me speaking.)

While my morning enthusiasm is partly sparked by the 10 minute routine I do after I get up (check it out here), there are 5 other habits that I haven’t shared with you, which really put a spring in my sleepy-eyed step…

In fact, it’s the five activities that I complete BEFORE I go to bed that make the biggest difference.

In the video below I’m going to walk you through the five things that you can do tonight to enjoy tomorrow even more, all of which are simple, practical and adaptable for your lifestyle.

Once you’ve had a chance to watch I’d love to hear from you. So stick around and join in the discussion at the bottom of the page.

To Recap, Here’s What We Covered

Evening Ritual #1: Protect Your Neck From Computer Posture

  • Fixing “chicken neck” isn’t as easy as seeing a Hollywood plastic surgeon, so you’d better start working on yours now!
  • Computer posture that causes you to stick your chin forward can put up to 60 pounds of extra pressure on your neck and spine, which over time can lead to disc compression, migraines, and neck and shoulder pain
  • In the video below I’m demonstrating exactly what those neck flexor exercises look like — try them tonight

 

Evening Ritual #2:  Turn Off All Screens 30 Minutes Before Bed

  • There are (at least) three good reasons to shut down your technology well before hitting the hay:
    • The blue light disrupts melatonin production, making it harder to fall asleep
    • Media is stimulating and you need to give your brain a break
    • Your favorite show is ruining any chance of developing an “early bed time” routine

 

Evening Ritual #3: Tidy Your Kitchen

  • Now you’ve shut down the tech a little earlier you can take some time to potter in the kitchen
  • Sit out things for a healthy breakfast (or your morning cup of Joe)
  • Put away anything that needs to be cleared…
  • It’s such a treat to wake up and see this neat space!

 

Evening Ritual #4: Journal For Gratitude & Reflection

  • “Busy brain syndrome” occurs when you’re body is tired but you’re mind is on fire with to-do’s, concerns and the random thoughts that only occur after lights out 
  • Not surprisingly, this is not conducive for getting a good nights sleep
  • My remedy is to do a quick evening journal practice that focuses on gratitude and reflection (learn about it here)

 

Evening Ritual #5: Set Out Tomorrow’s Clothes

  • Setting out an outfit before you go to bed saves the hassle of finding clothes in the morning…
  • This leaves you extra AM time for doing nice things…
  • I recommend making a healthy breakfast, taking a walk or catching up with a good book

 

Now I’d love to hear from you!

Do you have any evening rituals that make you excited to wake up the next day?

Let me know by leaving a comment below.

 

With love,

make meal prep easier jennifer dene wellness

How To Make Meal Prep Easier (Your “Dear Abby” Wellness Qs Answered)

Here’s a potentially embarrassing confession: I’d get a real kick out of writing for the Dear Abby column. I love sharing helpful advice and thoughtful opinions from the comfort of my own living room…just ask my husband!

However, considering that it’s been almost seven years since graduating with my journalism degree, and Jeanne Phillips — the current owner of the “Abby” pen name — hasn’t yet reached out to me on LinkedIn, I feel that the time has come to take matters into my own hands.

So we’ll be trying a little experiment for the next month or so…

Every Wednesday I’ll dedicate a post to one simple solution or strategy that will make it easier for you to squeeze more healthy habits into your every day life.

I’ll get the ball rolling, but I’d love for you to join in the discussion (see details at the end of this post).

My mission is to help women get back in the driver’s seat of their own health and happiness, by making healthy living simple AND enjoyable. This series should help.

Now on to today’s question…

What is one thing that I can do this weekend to make meal prep easier (if I only have one hour to spare)?

Even an hour spent in the kitchen on the weekend will ultimately save you time and money  — and make it easier to stick with your healthy eating habits. It’s a great way to get a head start on your weekday meals.

If there was only ONE thing that I could get done each weekend, it would be to cook and freeze my grains and starches. Preparing foods like rice, quinoa and sweet potatoes during the week is time-consuming, and it doesn’t make sense to do it on a meal-by-meal basis.

Instead, one Sunday a month my husband and I bulk cook these staples, and freeze them in portion sized freezer bags or tupperware containers. Come a random Tuesday evening I’m thrilled to thaw a bag of rice, bake a piece of fish, and cook some veggies with a dollop of butter. While dinner would have taken an hour if we were waiting on the grain, it comes together in 15 minutes (and there’s less washing up).

What can you cook and freeze?

Lots of things actually! We’ve had great success with the following, but I encourage you to experiment (note: these are listed in order of how long they take to cook): 

  • Beans (black, white, kidney, chickpeas…)
  • Lentils
  • Rice (basmati, white, brown and black)
  • Sweet potatoes (cubed and roasted)
  • Mashed potato or sweet potato
  • Butternut squash (cubed and roasted)
  • Quinoa
  • Pasta

 

TO COOK: Double or triple your regular quantity. Cook as normal. Allow to cool. Freeze in portions that are suitable for you and your family.

TO USE: Defrost in the fridge overnight, or use the microwave; heat in the oven, or use the microwave.

TIP: Start with the ingredient that takes the longest to cook — such as roasting sweet potatoes or boiling rice — and then move on to a quick-cook, like quinoa or pasta. That way everything should be done around the same time…roughly 45 minutes later.

Now I’d Love To Hear From You (Dear Abby…)

What are you struggling with in your health, fitness or self care / self love routine at the moment? What healthy habits do you see other people doing and you wonder — how do they do that? Nothing is too silly or too small!

Let me know in the comments below, and I’ll answer those Qs over the next couple of weeks.

Don’t like the idea of commenting publicly? Email info@jenniferdenewellness.com with the subject line: Q&A Post

 

Thank you for your energy, and making this community one that is positive, kind and purpose-driven.

 

With love,

home cooking Jennifer Dene Wellness

Empowered women wear aprons: the necessary return of home cooking

Today we’re talking about home cooking and why you need to get on board, for your body, your wallet and the environment . If you commit to only one thing for your health this week, let it be this.

I am so very grateful to my mum for not only setting an incredible example of what it means to be a home cook, but for teaching me how easy and enjoyable it is to put food on the table. I’m also grateful to my Nan, who taught us that we should never serve more than we can eat, and always reuse your leftovers and wash your ziplock bags!

In fact, most of my favorite childhood memories are linked to the family kitchen. Dad’s famous spaghetti bolognese, Nan’s boiled potatoes with dollops of butter, Mum’s spinach and ricotta stuffed pastry, Mandy’s pavlova, Chella’s gratin…So many happy moments have been shared digging into a home cooked meal with people I love.

If it wasn’t for my upbringing I would probably find this whole healthy eating thing to be quite challenging; from an outsiders perspective it can seem rather daunting to know what to eat and how to prepare it. (This is especially true living in Los Angeles where fad-diets reign supreme and the number of ‘superfoods’ in your pantry acts as a status symbol.)

There has never been an easier time to find recipes, watch cooking shows, or learn how to prepare ingredients on YouTube, yet we’re living in an age where people are cooking less than ever before. Part of this may be due to time (we’ll get to that) or not knowing how to cook (we’ll get to that too). However, I can also see that simple home cooking has been elevated to something gourmet, putting pressure on busy women to not only get food on the table, but to make it look like a Martha Stewart centerpiece.

Home cooking shouldn’t be seen as something elitist, expensive or complicated; it should be simple, enjoyable and affordable.

Healthy home cooking also doesn’t mean eating an undressed salad, or a meagre piece of fish with steamed asparagus. Making food from scratch let’s you be in control of the quality and quantity of ingredients that you’re using. This let’s you cut back on sodium, choose the best quality fats and meats, and bulk out the meal with lots of vegetables. It’s more economical, much better for you, and puts things like pizza back on the menu!

A 2015 study from Johns Hopkins University found that people who cook at home (without consciously trying to eat healthier or choose low calorie foods), eat at least 140 fewer calories per day. While that may seem small fry on a single day basis, at the end of the week that’s 980 calories, at the end of the month it’s 3920 calories, and at the end of the year you’d be saving over 47,000 calories — that’s all without ever looking at a calorie-counting app.

(And yes, I did have to use my calculator during the writing of that paragraph. If we want to talk about other traditional habits that are going down the gurgler, my math would be one of them.)

Apart from your waistline, home cooking also saves time, money and food waste. This last point is absolutely huge! Did you know that the biggest source of CO2 emissions on the planet is food waste? And that’s not by the big industry players, but by the everyday person throwing away groceries that they don’t use, or leftover food that they don’t eat. This is really troubling and should make us all feel more responsible for how we treat our food.

So let’s talk about why you’re not cooking more often at home, and I challenge you to give it a go every day for this week.

“Why I Don’t Cook” Myth 1: I Don’t Have Time

I don’t know about that. While I don’t have a scientific study to link to, I know how long it takes Nate and I to order food versus cook a meal at home. The latter wins for speed, hands down.

Going through the rigmarole of deciding where to go and what to eat, then ordering, picking it up or waiting for a delivery, unpacking things at home (discarding the packaging waste), reheating if needed…it’s a long process only to realize that it wasn’t even what we felt like.

On the other hand, the following meal takes about 15 minutes and will leave leftovers for lunch if I cook double:

Fill a big saucepan with cold water and some scrubbed, chopped potatoes. Boil the spuds until they’re soft enough to stick a knife into. Just before they finish cooking throw in a good handful of chopped broccoli and cook for 1-2 minutes. Drain the lot, put it back in the saucepan (no heat) and add a good bit of butter, salt and pepper. Meanwhile, grill a piece of salmon or some lamb chops under the broiler, for 8 minutes or until done to your liking. Pop it all on a plate and enjoy.

But perhaps you really do believe that you don’t have time. In that case, I recommend downloading your free copy of my video series Take Back Your Time: Practical Lessons In Creating Time Freedom For A Healthy, Happy Life.

“Why I Don’t Cook” Myth 2: It’s Too Expensive

This is one I hear all the time, but it’s just not true. Yes, making those ridiculous smoothie bowls that you see on Instagram would be expensive, but you also wouldn’t make them. It costs Nate and I about $20 to cook a big chicken curry with rice and greens (and yummy leftovers), but when we get Indian takeout we never walk away with change from a $50 note.

This is true even on the low end of the scale. To feed a family of four at McDonald’s (burgers, nuggets, fries and drinks) would cost you almost $28. For that same amount you could serve a whole roasted chicken, sweet potatoes and green vegetables. You’d probably have leftover chicken for lunch sandwiches, and you can even use the carcass to make homemade soup.

Plus there’s the very valid argument of investing in your health. So while these sweet potato brownies may cost more than opening a box from the supermarket, in the long run eating home cooked meals will save you a fortune in medical costs.

“Why I Don’t Cook” Myth 3: I Don’t Know How To Cook

That’s ok, it can feel overwhelming to learn new habits. However, cooking can be very simple and enjoyable. Start where you are and don’t try to be a gourmet chef — in my opinion some of the yummiest meals are the most simple). Buy a basic cookbook and learn one new dish each week; before long you’ll feel really comfortable in the kitchen. Challenge yourself to sticking to recipes that use 6 ingredients or less and you’ll be golden.

So what do you say, are you willing to cook at least one meal at home each day this week? I’ve thrown the gauntlet and would love to hear that you’ve picked it up, so please do leave a comment below.

Remember: healthy living is simple, eating well is not restrictive, and YOU CAN choose to create a body and a life that you love.

 

 

With love,

 

 

 

MAKE HARDBOILED EGGS

How To Make Hardboiled Eggs

In today’s post we’re going back to basics in the kitchen with a quick tutorial on how to make hardboiled eggs. Already eggscellent at this technique? Watch the video anyway to learn what kind of eggs you should be buying and a super nifty way to peel them.

Growing up I wasn’t much of an egg fan, preferring sweet over savory for breakfast (and sometimes that’s still the case). When I did eat them they had to be cooked within an inch of their life — I’m talking rock solid yolks, no wobble allowed.

But I liked the idea of liking eggs. It seemed to me a rather grown up thing to do, ordering poached eggs on sourdough for breakfast, so I decided to get on board with this egg eating thing once and for all.

And that’s where my love of hardboiled eggs started, probably because I could control the “wobble factor”.

Of course there are better reasons for eating eggs, ones that extend further than feeling grown up at a cafe. Such as:

  • Eggs contain all of the essential amino acids and a host of nutrients such as vitamin A, many B vitamins, selenium, phosphorus and folate
  • With six grams of protein per egg they help with weight loss and muscle repair
  • Plus new research (1) suggests that you can absorb nine times more nutrients when you eat whole eggs with raw vegetables.

Of course you get these benefits no matter how you cook them (as long as you keep the egg intact that is, no more egg white scrambles please). I rotate between hardboiled, poached and scrambled, but I find the former the easiest to have on hand for adding to breakfasts, salads and snacks.

So don your aprons and pop into the kitchen as we whip ourselves up a batch of hardboiled eggs.

(Psst: before you watch the video I have to apologize about the audio. The mic wasn’t working for the first half so it sounds a little strange…this is what happens when you leave a trainer and home cook in charge of video creation!)

How To Make Hardboiled Eggs

Choose the number of eggs you’d like to make and select a saucepan that’s large enough for them all (keep in mind that they keep in the fridge for 4 – 5 days)

  1. Place eggs in the saucepan, cover with cold water, add the lid
  2. Bring water to the boil and then immediately turn off heat
  3. Leave the eggs in the saucepan for 7 – 10 minutes (depending on your personal wobble-tolerance)
  4. Then remove the eggs and place them in a bowl of cold water – this stops them from cooking further
  5. Once cooled you can store them in a bowl in the fridge, or peel them using my spoon technique, which you can see at 2:02 in the video

Here Are Two Simple Egg Recipes You May Want To Try

Eggs & Avo On Toast

Not really a recipe so much as an idea: Toast a slice of bread. Spread some sliced avocado on top. Add a chopped egg, salt, red pepper flakes (optional) and maybe a squeeze of lime. Yum!

Mayo Free Egg Salad

Whisk together juice from 1/2 a lemon, 1 teaspoon dijon mustard and 1 tablespoon tahini (sesame seed paste). Add a little water if mixture is too thick. Add (chopped): 4 hardboiled eggs, 2 celery stalks, 1/4 green apple, 1/4 red onion, italian parsley. Mix it all together, season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve over greens with a side of rye bread.

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

On a scale of 1 – 10 (1 being almost raw and 10 being rock hard) how cooked do you like your yolks? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

More Sunday Prep Ideas

Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Flour Free Banana Pancakes

Work With Me 1:1

I have new spaces available in my 1:1 coaching program. It’s virtual (we hang out via Skype or phone) and 100% customized to suit your lifestyle. If you’re interested, or know someone who might be, please email jennifer@jenniferdenewellness.com to schedule your free consultation.

Until next time keep being fit, feminine & fabulous!

Cheerio,

JDW Signature

Flour-Free Pancakes

Flour-Free Pancakes: A Five Ingredient Recipe

Today’s recipe for flour-free pancakes is going to blow your socks off!

I’m including it in our Sunday Prep Series as I like to make a batch on the weekend and nibble on them throughout the week. You might decide to go all in and devour them for Sunday brunch. Whatever floats your boat.

I’ve spoken with many of you about what kind of recipes you would like to see on JDW. The verdict? Recipes that are quick, simple to prepare, use the least number of ingredients, and are healthy but still tasty. 

Got it!

With that in mind I wanted to remind you to download your free copy of  The Healthy Living Made Easy Menu

It includes five delicious recipes that can be prepared on the weekend and quickly served up throughout the week.

The Menu Includes:

  1. Grilled white fish with quinoa, asparagus, and peach & avocado salsa
  2. A loaded “taco” sweet potato
  3. Grass-fed beef burger salad with polenta wedges
  4. Cheat’s teriyaki chicken
  5. Mini ricotta and berry cheesecakes

Click here to download your free week.

Moving on to today’s recipe — Flour-free pancakes made with banana, coconut, eggs and blueberries.

Jennifer Dene Wellness is not a Paleo website, I don’t believe in no-carb diets (heck, I don’t believe in any kind of diets), and I don’t think that gluten is the enemy, if your stomach can digest it.

But the reality is that traditional pancakes just aren’t that healthy. Not only are pancakes packed with refined flour and sugar — two major players on the “less-is-more” ingredient list — they also don’t offer up enough protein or fiber.

Ever wondered why you get hungry quite quickly after visiting IHOP? Fiber and protein (both missing in classic pancakes) are the key to feeling full, and fueled, after eating.

That’s not to say you can’t ever eat pancakes. You can eat whatever you want. But we need to be honest and admit that they’re just not an “every day food”.

While there are loads of “healthy pancake” recipes on the internet they often use whole-wheat flour, or some kind of nut flour. But that’s just more ingredients for you to buy, and more money for you to spend.

I also don’t love the “swap-flour-for-nut-flour” craze. Nut flours are high in Omega 6 fatty acids, high in calories, and can easily go rancid if not used shortly after grinding. But perhaps that’s a topic for another day.

These pancakes are so easy to prepare— after reading the recipe once you’ll be able to whip them up in your sleep. They also require very few ingredients, and include fiber (bananas), protein (eggs), and healthy fats (coconut)

One Final Tip … 

If you choose to top your pancakes with maple syrup I want you to remember three things:

  1. Buy real maple syrup. The ingredient list should only read maple syrup. Nothing else.
  2. Measure your pour. One tablespoon of maple syrup has 14g of sugar! Gah! If you pour two tablespoons that’s your entire sugar intake reached for the day.
  3. Consider alternatives. Try the pancakes plain, they’re delicious. Or add a berry sauce: Heat 1/2 cup blueberries with 1 tablespoon of water and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small saucepan, or the microwave. Once the berries have softened, and the water is mostly absorbed, pour over your pancakes.

Banana & Coconut Flour-Free Pancakes

(Makes 10 pancakes) (Gluten Free)

Flour-Free Pancakes

Ingredients:

  • 3 ripe bananas
  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1 cup blueberries (fresh or thawed if frozen)
  • 2 tsp coconut oil, for frying

Directions:

  1. Mash the bananas with a fork. Place in a medium-sized bowl and whisk together with the eggs and coconut. Add the blueberries (reserve a few for serving) and stir well.
  2. Heat the coconut oil in a 10in (25cm) non-stick frying pan over a medium hear. Add two to three tablespoons of batter for each pancake. You should be able to fit 3 to 4 pancakes in at a time. Use a spatula to carefully flip the pancakes when they have set and the bottom is golden — about 2 minutes on the first side and 1 minute on the other.
  3. Stack the pancakes and top with reserved blueberries.

This recipe was created by Green Kitchen Stories

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

Are you going to try these pancakes? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

With love,

JDW Signature

P.S. I’m not totally hating on pancakes! Remember the expression: everything in moderation, including moderation.
low sugar bircher mueslie

Recipe: Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Today’s bircher muesli recipe is part of my Sunday Prep series; simple recipes that can be prepared on the weekend and eaten during the week.

Starting the day with a healthy breakfast, preferably after some kind of physical activity, sets the tone for a feel-good kind of day. By fueling up with protein, fiber, complex carbohydrates and high quality fats you’re giving your body and mind the energy it needs to stay active and focused.

But preparing a wholesome meal first thing in the morning can sometimes be a little challenging, especially if you’re crunched for time. This breakfast recipe makes mornings a breeze.

I hope that you’ll spend the time you save doing something relaxing while you eat, such as reading a book, making notes in your journal, or (even better) sitting in the sunshine!

Pssst: Want a little more? Download my complete Sunday Prep guide, with five tasty recipes, plus a grocery list, and two 30 minute workout videos for free. Get your FREE sample week here.

What’s Bircher Muesli?

You may know bircher muesli as “overnight oats” — they are pretty much the same thing. Rolled oats are soaked in liquid with a few added bits of deliciousness thrown in.

This recipe is as simple as mixing the ingredients together, leaving it in the fridge overnight, and enjoying a yummy, healthy breakfast the next day.

Traditionally, in Australia at least, bircher muesli is made by soaking the oats in apple juice, with lots of grated apple and sultanas, and a good drizzle of honey. It’s delicious. But it’s also really high in sugar. My low sugar recipe uses coconut milk and plain yogurt, with added sweetness from whole fruit. You can drizzle a little honey to serve, or use a few drops of liquid stevia.

Apart from taking the stress of out of breakfast, soaking oats overnight is better for your body than eating them raw. Soaked oats are easier to digest, reducing post-breakfast bloat AND helping you to absorb more minerals from the oats themselves.

Soaking oats (or cooking them as oatmeal) also makes them expand, which means that you can eat a larger portion without the extra calories. Not that we’re in the business of counting calories, but we’re also not in the business of overeating!

Speaking of overeating…in the video I am making a bowl of bircher muesli for Nate, my husband, who, as I mention, is a rather hungry fellow. You may prefer to divide the ingredients into two (or even three) bowls.

Remember to always listen to your body when it comes to eating.

In the video I’m showing you how to make this recipe, and adding in a few tips along the way. Don’t have time to watch right now? Scoot to the end of the page and grab the recipe instead.

 

Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Serves 2 – 3 | Print It Here
Customize this recipe by adding your favorite toppings, or use different grains (such as brown rice, buckwheat or quinoa flakes) in place of, or as a combination with, the oats.

1 cup thick rolled oats (not instant)

1/2 cup coconut milk

1/2 cup plain yogurt (unsweetened)

1/2 a green apple, grated

juice from 1/2 a lemon (optional)

1/2 cup frozen blueberries

1/4 cup walnuts

Additional scrumptious things: shredded coconut, cinnamon, seeds…

Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; mix well (add a little water if mixture is too thick). Divide into serving bowls and leave in the fridge for two hours or overnight. Enjoy.

You Might Also Like:

The morning fiber bowl that keeps you regular.
How to wash & store your fresh produce.

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

What’s your breakfast of choice this week? Let me know by leaving a comment below.

With Love,
JDW Signature

 

P.S. Want recipes and workouts that will make healthy living a breeze? Download your free week of the Healthy Living Made Easy Program
How To Store Fruit And Vegetables | Jennifer Dene

How To Store Fruit And Vegetables For Maximum Shelf Life

As a health coach and keen home cook I’m regularly asked for simple tips that make healthy living easy. One of the first suggestions that I give is to spend 30 minutes in the kitchen each weekend to prepare fresh produce.

Knowing how to store fruit and vegetables correctly will not only extend the shelf life of your produce, it also makes it a breeze to eat healthfully during the busy week.

Here are three reasons why I do this every weekend:

  • It may sound lazy but I hate washing fruits and vegetables every time I cook. Having clean produce in the fridge makes it easy to munch my way to good health.
  • Knowing how to correctly wash and store your fruit and vegetables will keep it fresh for longer, saving you time and money.
  • The time spent up front will save you hours during the week. If I spend about two hours each week on Sunday Prep, I will have a healthy dinner on the table every night in 30 minutes or less (including washing up).

In today’s video I’m sharing 6 storage tips that will keep your produce fresher for longer, and help you to eat more fruit and vegetables every day.

(Think you don’t have 30 minutes to spare on the weekend? Get my free audio training: Take Back Your Time To Create A Body & Life That You Love. Click here to learn more)

Tip #1 Invest In Storage Containers & Ziploc Bags

Airtight glass storage containers come in handy for storing “crunchy” produce such as radishes and snap peas, as well as chopped vegetables and leftover meals. Plus it’s oh-so-satisfying to stack them neatly in the fridge. 

Tip #2 Store Leafy Greens & Herbs In A Punctured Ziploc Bag

Fruits and vegetables emit an odorless, colorless gas called Ethylene that triggers the ripening process of produce. Leafy greens are particularly sensitive to Ethylene gas and will quickly wilt when shoved in the refrigerator next to other produce.

Storing greens in bags protects them from the gas emitted by other produce, and the small holes allow the Ethylene emitted by the greens themselves to escape. Using this one trick allowed me to keep a head of bibb lettuce fresh for over two weeks!

I actually filmed a video exclusively on washing and storing leafy greens. You can watch it here.

Tip #3 Wash Thick-Skinned Produce

You might not think to wash the inedible skin on produce like lemons, avocado, pumpkins and melons, but every time cut into these fruits and vegetables you are taking the dirt and chemicals from the peel and slicing them directly into the flesh. 

Tip #4 Store Asparagus In A Glass Jug

This tip goes for anything that has a tendency to wilt, including herbs, baby carrots and scallions. Sticking the ends in a glass jug with an inch of water will keep this produce crisp and crunchy.

Tip #5 Keep Tomatoes & Stone Fruit On The Bench

I never refrigerating tomatoes or stone fruits. This isn’t to prolong their shelf life — they will continue to ripen on the bench — but it will make them taste a lot more vibrant.

Tip #6 Don’t store your potatoes and onions together.

Potatoes produce a LOT of Ethylene gas and onions are super sensitive to the stuff, so storing these two veggies side by side will quickly turn your onions brown and soft.

It’s been fun to be in the kitchen with you today! See you again soon.

With love,

JDW Signature