Flour-Free Pancakes

Flour-Free Pancakes: A Five Ingredient Recipe

Today’s recipe for flour-free pancakes is going to blow your socks off!

I’m including it in our Sunday Prep Series as I like to make a batch on the weekend and nibble on them throughout the week. You might decide to go all in and devour them for Sunday brunch. Whatever floats your boat.

I’ve spoken with many of you about what kind of recipes you would like to see on JDW. The verdict? Recipes that are quick, simple to prepare, use the least number of ingredients, and are healthy but still tasty. 

Got it!

With that in mind I wanted to remind you to download your free copy of  The Healthy Living Made Easy Menu

It includes five delicious recipes that can be prepared on the weekend and quickly served up throughout the week.

The Menu Includes:

  1. Grilled white fish with quinoa, asparagus, and peach & avocado salsa
  2. A loaded “taco” sweet potato
  3. Grass-fed beef burger salad with polenta wedges
  4. Cheat’s teriyaki chicken
  5. Mini ricotta and berry cheesecakes

Click here to download your free week.

Moving on to today’s recipe — Flour-free pancakes made with banana, coconut, eggs and blueberries.

Jennifer Dene Wellness is not a Paleo website, I don’t believe in no-carb diets (heck, I don’t believe in any kind of diets), and I don’t think that gluten is the enemy, if your stomach can digest it.

But the reality is that traditional pancakes just aren’t that healthy. Not only are pancakes packed with refined flour and sugar — two major players on the “less-is-more” ingredient list — they also don’t offer up enough protein or fiber.

Ever wondered why you get hungry quite quickly after visiting IHOP? Fiber and protein (both missing in classic pancakes) are the key to feeling full, and fueled, after eating.

That’s not to say you can’t ever eat pancakes. You can eat whatever you want. But we need to be honest and admit that they’re just not an “every day food”.

While there are loads of “healthy pancake” recipes on the internet they often use whole-wheat flour, or some kind of nut flour. But that’s just more ingredients for you to buy, and more money for you to spend.

I also don’t love the “swap-flour-for-nut-flour” craze. Nut flours are high in Omega 6 fatty acids, high in calories, and can easily go rancid if not used shortly after grinding. But perhaps that’s a topic for another day.

These pancakes are so easy to prepare— after reading the recipe once you’ll be able to whip them up in your sleep. They also require very few ingredients, and include fiber (bananas), protein (eggs), and healthy fats (coconut)

One Final Tip … 

If you choose to top your pancakes with maple syrup I want you to remember three things:

  1. Buy real maple syrup. The ingredient list should only read maple syrup. Nothing else.
  2. Measure your pour. One tablespoon of maple syrup has 14g of sugar! Gah! If you pour two tablespoons that’s your entire sugar intake reached for the day.
  3. Consider alternatives. Try the pancakes plain, they’re delicious. Or add a berry sauce: Heat 1/2 cup blueberries with 1 tablespoon of water and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small saucepan, or the microwave. Once the berries have softened, and the water is mostly absorbed, pour over your pancakes.

Banana & Coconut Flour-Free Pancakes

(Makes 10 pancakes) (Gluten Free)

Flour-Free Pancakes

Ingredients:

  • 3 ripe bananas
  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1 cup blueberries (fresh or thawed if frozen)
  • 2 tsp coconut oil, for frying

Directions:

  1. Mash the bananas with a fork. Place in a medium-sized bowl and whisk together with the eggs and coconut. Add the blueberries (reserve a few for serving) and stir well.
  2. Heat the coconut oil in a 10in (25cm) non-stick frying pan over a medium hear. Add two to three tablespoons of batter for each pancake. You should be able to fit 3 to 4 pancakes in at a time. Use a spatula to carefully flip the pancakes when they have set and the bottom is golden — about 2 minutes on the first side and 1 minute on the other.
  3. Stack the pancakes and top with reserved blueberries.

This recipe was created by Green Kitchen Stories

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

Are you going to try these pancakes? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

With love,

JDW Signature

P.S. I’m not totally hating on pancakes! Remember the expression: everything in moderation, including moderation.
low sugar bircher mueslie

Recipe: Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Today’s bircher muesli recipe is part of my Sunday Prep series; simple recipes that can be prepared on the weekend and eaten during the week.

Starting the day with a healthy breakfast, preferably after some kind of physical activity, sets the tone for a feel-good kind of day. By fueling up with protein, fiber, complex carbohydrates and high quality fats you’re giving your body and mind the energy it needs to stay active and focused.

But preparing a wholesome meal first thing in the morning can sometimes be a little challenging, especially if you’re crunched for time. This breakfast recipe makes mornings a breeze.

I hope that you’ll spend the time you save doing something relaxing while you eat, such as reading a book, making notes in your journal, or (even better) sitting in the sunshine!

Pssst: Want a little more? Download my complete Sunday Prep guide, with five tasty recipes, plus a grocery list, and two 30 minute workout videos for free. Get your FREE sample week here.

What’s Bircher Muesli?

You may know bircher muesli as “overnight oats” — they are pretty much the same thing. Rolled oats are soaked in liquid with a few added bits of deliciousness thrown in.

This recipe is as simple as mixing the ingredients together, leaving it in the fridge overnight, and enjoying a yummy, healthy breakfast the next day.

Traditionally, in Australia at least, bircher muesli is made by soaking the oats in apple juice, with lots of grated apple and sultanas, and a good drizzle of honey. It’s delicious. But it’s also really high in sugar. My low sugar recipe uses coconut milk and plain yogurt, with added sweetness from whole fruit. You can drizzle a little honey to serve, or use a few drops of liquid stevia.

Apart from taking the stress of out of breakfast, soaking oats overnight is better for your body than eating them raw. Soaked oats are easier to digest, reducing post-breakfast bloat AND helping you to absorb more minerals from the oats themselves.

Soaking oats (or cooking them as oatmeal) also makes them expand, which means that you can eat a larger portion without the extra calories. Not that we’re in the business of counting calories, but we’re also not in the business of overeating!

Speaking of overeating…in the video I am making a bowl of bircher muesli for Nate, my husband, who, as I mention, is a rather hungry fellow. You may prefer to divide the ingredients into two (or even three) bowls.

Remember to always listen to your body when it comes to eating.

In the video I’m showing you how to make this recipe, and adding in a few tips along the way. Don’t have time to watch right now? Scoot to the end of the page and grab the recipe instead.

 

Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Serves 2 – 3 | Print It Here
Customize this recipe by adding your favorite toppings, or use different grains (such as brown rice, buckwheat or quinoa flakes) in place of, or as a combination with, the oats.

1 cup thick rolled oats (not instant)

1/2 cup coconut milk

1/2 cup plain yogurt (unsweetened)

1/2 a green apple, grated

juice from 1/2 a lemon (optional)

1/2 cup frozen blueberries

1/4 cup walnuts

Additional scrumptious things: shredded coconut, cinnamon, seeds…

Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; mix well (add a little water if mixture is too thick). Divide into serving bowls and leave in the fridge for two hours or overnight. Enjoy.

You Might Also Like:

The morning fiber bowl that keeps you regular.
How to wash & store your fresh produce.

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

What’s your breakfast of choice this week? Let me know by leaving a comment below.

With Love,
JDW Signature

 

P.S. Want recipes and workouts that will make healthy living a breeze? Download your free week of the Healthy Living Made Easy Program
How To Store Fruit And Vegetables | Jennifer Dene

How To Store Fruit And Vegetables For Maximum Shelf Life

As a health coach and keen home cook I’m regularly asked for simple tips that make healthy living easy. One of the first suggestions that I give is to spend 30 minutes in the kitchen each weekend to prepare fresh produce.

Knowing how to store fruit and vegetables correctly will not only extend the shelf life of your produce, it also makes it a breeze to eat healthfully during the busy week.

Here are three reasons why I do this every weekend:

  • It may sound lazy but I hate washing fruits and vegetables every time I cook. Having clean produce in the fridge makes it easy to munch my way to good health.
  • Knowing how to correctly wash and store your fruit and vegetables will keep it fresh for longer, saving you time and money.
  • The time spent up front will save you hours during the week. If I spend about two hours each week on Sunday Prep, I will have a healthy dinner on the table every night in 30 minutes or less (including washing up).

In today’s video I’m sharing 6 storage tips that will keep your produce fresher for longer, and help you to eat more fruit and vegetables every day.

(Think you don’t have 30 minutes to spare on the weekend? Get my free audio training: Take Back Your Time To Create A Body & Life That You Love. Click here to learn more)

Tip #1 Invest In Storage Containers & Ziploc Bags

Airtight glass storage containers come in handy for storing “crunchy” produce such as radishes and snap peas, as well as chopped vegetables and leftover meals. Plus it’s oh-so-satisfying to stack them neatly in the fridge. 

Tip #2 Store Leafy Greens & Herbs In A Punctured Ziploc Bag

Fruits and vegetables emit an odorless, colorless gas called Ethylene that triggers the ripening process of produce. Leafy greens are particularly sensitive to Ethylene gas and will quickly wilt when shoved in the refrigerator next to other produce.

Storing greens in bags protects them from the gas emitted by other produce, and the small holes allow the Ethylene emitted by the greens themselves to escape. Using this one trick allowed me to keep a head of bibb lettuce fresh for over two weeks!

I actually filmed a video exclusively on washing and storing leafy greens. You can watch it here.

Tip #3 Wash Thick-Skinned Produce

You might not think to wash the inedible skin on produce like lemons, avocado, pumpkins and melons, but every time cut into these fruits and vegetables you are taking the dirt and chemicals from the peel and slicing them directly into the flesh. 

Tip #4 Store Asparagus In A Glass Jug

This tip goes for anything that has a tendency to wilt, including herbs, baby carrots and scallions. Sticking the ends in a glass jug with an inch of water will keep this produce crisp and crunchy.

Tip #5 Keep Tomatoes & Stone Fruit On The Bench

I never refrigerating tomatoes or stone fruits. This isn’t to prolong their shelf life — they will continue to ripen on the bench — but it will make them taste a lot more vibrant.

Tip #6 Don’t store your potatoes and onions together.

Potatoes produce a LOT of Ethylene gas and onions are super sensitive to the stuff, so storing these two veggies side by side will quickly turn your onions brown and soft.

It’s been fun to be in the kitchen with you today! See you again soon.

With love,

JDW Signature