eating well

The science is in — eating well just became a WHOLE lot easier

I’ve gotta admit that I love it when my opinions are backed up by brilliant women and men wearing white lab coats.


It happened again last week when a new study published in JAMA confirmed that calorie-restriction ISN’T the best way to reach and maintain a healthy weight, and what really matters is food quality, not food quantity.


​For years I’ve been saying that WHAT you eat matters more than HOW MUCH you eat. And, when it comes to eating for self-love, we need to prioritize the foods that best nourish our bodies.

Eating well is how I overcame a decade of anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating; providing my body with the nutrients it needed allowed me to regenerate physically, mentally, and emotionally.


Obsessing about portion sizes, eliminating macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbs), or avoiding healthy foods because they’re calorically dense takes up WAY too much mental real estate. Think about all the time and brainpower you can suddenly regain by letting go of such restrictive thinking.


The study, which was carried out on 600 people, found that participants lost a significant amount of weight by replacing added sugar, refined carbohydrates, and highly processed foods with vegetables, complex grains, and whole foods. Not rocket science, right?

​But here’s the clincher: unlike other studies that set extremely restrictive limitations on specific food groups, participants of this study lost weight regardless of the calories or portion sizes eaten.


It’s not that calories don’t matter, but food quality matters more. Plus, it becomes a lot easier to eat an appropriate number of calories for your weight, age, and physical activity level when you eat real food. (Are you more likely to overeat a farro, roasted vegetable, and feta cheese salad, or a packet of Doritos or bowl of mac & cheese?)

The bottom line is this

Eating well is very easy to do and doesn’t require you to follow every trend that the diet industry throws your way. Focusing on food quality is the cheapest, easiest and most enjoyable way to lose weight and gain better health.


This week I encourage you to let go of food-phobia. Then ask yourself, how you can make the meals you’re already eating a little more nutritious?


Let me know how it goes!



With love,



In my program, Slim Down With Self Love Bootcamp, I teach women exactly how to do this, so that they can let go of food fear, and eat in a way that makes them feel well, look well, and live well. Registration for the program has closed, but you can join the waitlist for our October release HERE.




How To Plan 90 Days Of Dinners In 60 Minutes

I enjoy writing to you in the early hours of the morning. This quiet time is best for thinking about what is working in my life that could also help you feel a little healthier, happier and more content in yours.

Today, my mind wanders back to last Friday in Napa, where I was speaking with my sister-in-law about meal planning. If you remember, I used to be an avid meal planner, before the whole thing became a little time-consuming. Since then I have focused on one meal at a time, rather than a weekly menu. Flying by the seat of our dinner pants did suit our schedule for a surprisingly long time. But recent life changes — namely my pregnancy penchant for eating at 6 pm — have required us to go back to the tried-and-true meal plan concept.

Which is why my little tete-a-tete in Napa was such an eye-opening conversation. My sister-in-law, a spreadsheet whiz, decided to make a monthly meal plan to use on repeat. She created four weekly menus, with many nights following a similar theme, and has been repeating it each month.

Aside from the time she saves thinking about food, the benefits of this routine include:

  • Having a ready-made grocery list
  • Knowing how much food will cost each week
  • And not defaulting to cooking the same meal night-after-night.

I imagine that Steve Jobs would have like this method of menu organization. The billionaire computer genius may have been famous for creating Apple, but he also makes a fascinating case study of daily habits. Jobs’ uniform of blue jeans and black turtleneck wasn’t a fashion statement, but rather a statement of intelligence: limiting the number of (useless) decisions one needs to make every day leaves more brain power for thinking, conversing and deciding on things that honestly matter. The choice to wear a turtleneck or a button-down pales in comparison to figuring out how to create the most revolutionary tech company in history.

Decision fatigue is a real thing, and when it comes to healthy eating, it can be your downfall. Figuring out what to eat every meal of every day is exhausting, but not pre-planning is a recipe for living on takeout, packaged food or grilled cheese sandwiches. 

My sister-in-law’s strategy is excellent for anyone who wants diversity on their dinner plate without reinventing the wheel every single night. On the hour-long flight back from Sacramento to LAX, I actioned her suggestion and came up with 28 dinner recipes to repeat for the next three months.

(I used this same technique to pre-plan my prenatal workouts and can see myself getting addicted to Excel organization charts…Sorry, Nate!)

Interested in making your own batched meal plan? I hope so! Here’s a video that shows you exactly how to do it:



Until next week, stay healthy, happy and content.


With love,

Gluten Free Spinach Feta Muffins

I don’t tend to share many recipes on this blog. The reason being that when it comes to helping women improve their health, I believe that we need to start with how we think and feel, before we can confidently change how we act.

Also, as much as I love food — and I really love food — my weekly meals are very simple and not particularly blog-worthy. There are only so many times that I can share a photo of grilled salmon,  chicken curry, veggie stir-fry, overnight oats or broiled lamb chops until we all get a little sick of it!

Even if I kept a more food-focused blog (as I did hilariously, and with terrible photography, at Blushing Strawberries in 2010/2011), that alone won’t make YOU a healthier eater.

Because here’s the thing: it’s not your access to healthy recipes that’s the problem, it’s your unwillingness to cook them. 

In previous posts I’ve touched on:

>>> The 3 Biggest Myths That Are Keeping You Out Of The Kitchen

>>> And why you need to reduce your consumption of sugary processed foods.

Today I want to tell you how proper nutrition was essential in my recovery from binge-eating.


Full disclosure: I am not a psychologist or dietitian, nor do I have any training in the field of eating disorders. What I do have, however, is my own experience, and my understanding that it was a combination of self love practices and proper nutrition that helped me create a healthy relationship with food.


If you’ve ever binged, or regularly tend to over-eat, you’ll know how physically and emotionally exhausting that process is. My personal experience was that I would restrict calories throughout the day and then binge at night. By the time I went to bed my stomach was so tight that you could have popped it with a pin. After every episode I would cry myself to sleep, and the next morning I would wake with equal parts indigestion and massive guilt. The cycle continued.

To overcome binge eating I tried to place (further) restrictions on myself:

  • Certain foods wouldn’t be allowed in the house
  • I’d eat with smaller bowls
  • Breakfast became my biggest meal and I would attempt to eat a peasant’s dinner (this was awful…dinner is my favorite!)
  • I would avoid eating snacks at parties, only to go home ravenous and polish off three bowls of cereal
  • I asked my husband to “not let me go back for seconds”
  • Every morning I would blame and berate myself…unsurprisingly, not a terribly effective strategy.

I’ve since learnt is that wasn’t the fault of the food, the crockery, the willpower, etc. The simple truth was that I was starving, and you might be too.


If you’re not eating your fill of nutritious foods throughout the day (yes, fats and carbohydrates are included), then your body will always be crying out for more. The problem is that when you’re running on empty, when its dark outside, and you’re wearing your sweatpants… that more tends to be easy-to-access, processed crap, and a lot of it.

Fortunately, that doesn’t have to be your future reality. If you want to find food freedom in your own life, then you have to stop being afraid of eating.

When you eat well — when you eat enough of the good stuff, and mindfully enjoy some of the treat stuff — it becomes easy to enjoy your food and your good health, without willpower, deprivation, or the obsessive need to check your weight at the end of any big meal.

So your goal for this week is to take a keen look at your plate and ask if depriving yourself of proper food is actually your biggest health and nutrition downfall.

And to help make things a little easier, I thought I would post a recipe today! These are my spinach and feta muffins, and they’re wonderful to grab as breakfast-on-the-go, a healthy snack, or as a side to a luscious lunch salad.



Gluten Free Spinach Feta Muffins

Dry Ingredients

  • 2 cups spelt flour or all purpose gluten free flour 
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 large handful baby spinach leaves, torn

Wet Ingredients

  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup (125 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup full-fat plain yogurt
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree*
  • 1/2 cup (4oz, 100grams) crumbled feta


1. Preheat your oven to 350°F / 180°C. Line a 12-hole muffin tray with muffin liners.

2. Combine the dry ingredients together in a large bowl, stirring with a fork to break up any clumps. In a separate bowl, mix together all the wet ingredients EXCEPT for the feta.

3. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and pour the wet mixture into the dry. Use a large spoon to fold together until combined.

4. Spoon batter evenly into the muffin liners and crumble feta over the tops of each muffin.

5. Bake in the centre of the oven for 25 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the muffins comes out clean.

5. Allow to cool for 10 minutes in the tin and then remove and continue cooling on a wire rack.

*Purchase pumpkin puree cans in the supermarket. Check the ingredient label, they should read pumpkin only. This is different from pumpkin pie filling which has sugar and spices added. To make your own puree: peel and chop a medium butternut squash or 2 pounds of sweet potatoes. Place in a pot of boiling water and cook for 8-10 minutes or until soft. Drain and then puree in a blender. Measure out about 14oz or 400g for the recipe. Freeze the rest to use next time.


With love,

wellness-obsession jennifer dene

Perhaps you’re overcomplicating this health thing?

The Los Angeles wellness obsession has gone bonkers.

This isn’t new information— I live in a city where people pay thousands of dollars to have their fat frozen and spend a week’s take-home wage on juice cleansing — but it’s gotten out of control.

The straw that has broken this camel’s back came last night when I popped into the supermarket. As I quickly dashed about filling my basket with veg, milk and eggs, my inquisitive-journalist ears picked up the sounds of a conversation that would only take place in a city like L.A.

Following the treble tones, I turned into the aisle to find two women having an anxious and in-depth conversation about which brand of water they should buy.

I kid you not.

It went like this:

“This one is reverse osmosis”, says the brunette wearing a red neckerchief and holding a $6.99 bottle of H20.

“But this one has added electrolytes,” counters the blonde, pointing her manicured fingers at a label that has flown halfway across the world to sit on this mid-Wilshire shelf.

“Perhaps we should buy the glass bottles?” suggests the first. “To avoid BPAs.”

“Sure, that works…just make sure you read the nutrition label,” replies the second, a little more quietly as she catches me watching, transfixed.

I tear my eyes away, stash a few (home-brand) club sodas into my basket and head to the self service checkout, trying not to giggle at the scene I just observed.

Read the nutrition label on your water? Now that’s a new one!

Look, I’m not scoffing at these women’s determination to hydrate — drinking clean water is very, very important. And if you have the luxury of being able to afford the brand that is alkalized, charcoal-filtered or lovingly bottled at a cold mountain spring, and drinking that type of water floats your boat, then power to you.

But the reality is that it’s totally unnecessary to take a simple health habit — drink more water — and make it something complicated, and frankly a little bourgeoisie. Honestly, do YOU have the time or mental bandwidth to deliberate the pros and cons of various water brands? I sure as heck don’t!

As your wellness coach I suggest that you spend more time drinking water and less time worrying about the ideal way to do it. (Insider tip: the tap turns to the left.)

This goes for any new healthy habit…the easiest way to make progress is by simply starting.

Want to get fit? Lace up your sneakers and walk around your neighborhood.

Want to eat healthier? Load up your basket with fruit, veg and whole grains, and stop buying brightly colored boxes plastered with words like “healthy!” and “fiber!”. (These words are often there to disguise the whopping amount of sugar, sodium or trans-fats that the product contains.)

I know that I’ve talked about this before, but I will continue to beat the drum until we all get the message that being healthy is actually very simple.

The healthiest people that I know are not the ones who agonize over every last detail to make the perfect choice. They don’t obsess over what they eat, how they move, or what they weigh. They don’t trap themselves into rigid lifestyle habits or overload their days with unrealistic goals and expectations. And they certainly don’t spend Sunday evening in the supermarket, analyzing the merits of drinking water.

So your goal for this week is to commit to becoming one of the healthy ones.

You can do that in three steps:

  1. Pinpoint an area of your life that is being held back by perfectionism, analysis-paralysis or straight up laziness.
  2. Set an intention to change one single habit related to that area.
  3. Take swift action, today, tomorrow, the next day, and so on; improve as you go, and know that each day you choose to do something different is the day that your life will change.

As always, let me know how it goes…


With love,

healthy evening habits

5 Things To Do Tonight (And Enjoy Tomorrow Even More)

Do you jump out of bed at the buzz of the alarm?

Or are you more closely acquainted with SNOOZE than the first rays of sunshine?

Personally I’ve never been one to stick my head under the pillow. I compare waking up to ripping off a Bandaid — if you’ve got to get it done, you might as well just do it.

(But that might just be the country girl in me speaking.)

While my morning enthusiasm is partly sparked by the 10 minute routine I do after I get up (check it out here), there are 5 other habits that I haven’t shared with you, which really put a spring in my sleepy-eyed step…

In fact, it’s the five activities that I complete BEFORE I go to bed that make the biggest difference.

In the video below I’m going to walk you through the five things that you can do tonight to enjoy tomorrow even more, all of which are simple, practical and adaptable for your lifestyle.

Once you’ve had a chance to watch I’d love to hear from you. So stick around and join in the discussion at the bottom of the page.

To Recap, Here’s What We Covered

Evening Ritual #1: Protect Your Neck From Computer Posture

  • Fixing “chicken neck” isn’t as easy as seeing a Hollywood plastic surgeon, so you’d better start working on yours now!
  • Computer posture that causes you to stick your chin forward can put up to 60 pounds of extra pressure on your neck and spine, which over time can lead to disc compression, migraines, and neck and shoulder pain
  • In the video below I’m demonstrating exactly what those neck flexor exercises look like — try them tonight


Evening Ritual #2:  Turn Off All Screens 30 Minutes Before Bed

  • There are (at least) three good reasons to shut down your technology well before hitting the hay:
    • The blue light disrupts melatonin production, making it harder to fall asleep
    • Media is stimulating and you need to give your brain a break
    • Your favorite show is ruining any chance of developing an “early bed time” routine


Evening Ritual #3: Tidy Your Kitchen

  • Now you’ve shut down the tech a little earlier you can take some time to potter in the kitchen
  • Sit out things for a healthy breakfast (or your morning cup of Joe)
  • Put away anything that needs to be cleared…
  • It’s such a treat to wake up and see this neat space!


Evening Ritual #4: Journal For Gratitude & Reflection

  • “Busy brain syndrome” occurs when you’re body is tired but you’re mind is on fire with to-do’s, concerns and the random thoughts that only occur after lights out 
  • Not surprisingly, this is not conducive for getting a good nights sleep
  • My remedy is to do a quick evening journal practice that focuses on gratitude and reflection (learn about it here)


Evening Ritual #5: Set Out Tomorrow’s Clothes

  • Setting out an outfit before you go to bed saves the hassle of finding clothes in the morning…
  • This leaves you extra AM time for doing nice things…
  • I recommend making a healthy breakfast, taking a walk or catching up with a good book


Now I’d love to hear from you!

Do you have any evening rituals that make you excited to wake up the next day?

Let me know by leaving a comment below.


With love,

People Criticize Your Healthy Lifestyle

What To Do When People Criticize Your Healthy Lifestyle

I recently had afternoon tea with a couple of close friends in Sydney. It had been about 8 months since we’d last seen each other, during which time I knew they had made some dietary tweaks. Being the curious health coach that I am, I wanted to ask them how it all went.

They told me that by making a few simple lifestyle updates — and bringing just a little more awareness to what was going on their plate — they’ve landed on a way of eating that makes them look and feel great.

I was thrilled! I love hearing that simple strategies bring great results, as that’s my philosophy through and through.

Yet as we chatted more about food, our conversation revealed a challenge that my friends had been facing. It was something that I’m also intimately familiar with and it rings true for many friends and clients who have chosen to shake things up in the healthy living department.

It’s been my experience that when you change how you eat – specifically, when you choose to become a more healthy eater – it’s not uncommon to feel isolated, teased or even ostracized by people that you know.

That’s why in today’s post I wanted to talk about how to handle this situation, as you may experience it too.

Let’s start with WHY “changing your diet” is such a touchy subject.

At its most fundamental level food is nothing more than a source of energy, vitamins and minerals. But we all know that it’s more than that.

Food is culture, family tradition, memories, and at the heart of many (if not most) social events.

This can make it a tricky subject to talk about.

You see, when you decide to change your diet it can send a message to the people around you that you no longer agree with something that you used to do. This wouldn’t be a problem if it wasn’t for the fact that what you’re changing is most likely something that they’re still doing. You’re upsetting the status quo, and they might see you as judging the lifestyle choices they’ve made.

In short, your personal development choices might make people uneasy.

Let me give you an example:

In 2009 one of my best friends was diagnosed with Chron’s disease and placed on a strict anti-inflammatory diet. Despite already being a healthy eater, this was a major lifestyle change (especially for someone who was only 21).

Back then, anti-inflammatory diets weren’t really a big thing. Paleo and veganism lived on the fringes of society, and many people thought autoimmune diseases sounded a little woo-woo…a little “all in their heads”.

So one day my friend told our group that she would no longer be able to participate in our Friday night habit of drinking gin and tonics, and eating Ben & Jerry’s ice cream.

That didn’t go down so well.

Without minimizing my own culpability — I can remember using the expression “you can’t even have one?” —  I can tell you that another member of our group (let’s call her ‘Z’) was absolutely shattered.

“What good is it to live in a world where you can’t eat ice cream?” she cried dramatically.

The next Friday night my friend arrived at our house with an apple, a carrot, a bag of nuts and a bottle of water. Z was appalled and couldn’t stop talking about how “dangerous” and “extreme” this diet was.

(Apples, it seems, can have that effect on some people.)

You see, by changing her own diet my friend was challenging the shared Friday night experience that we had come to know and love. Her choices made us all question if we should do things differently too.

To be honest, we weren’t even thinking about WHY she was making those updates (and in hindsight, offering to support her through the process would have been the preferred reaction), but we were only thinking about ourselves.  We didn’t like feeling guilty about our own choice to be less than healthy on Friday nights and it seemed to us like she no longer wanted to be part of the pack.

But the silly thing is, that wasn’t her intent at all.  She was just making the best decision for herself, and for whatever reason that made us feel uncomfortable.  I learned then and there that everyone is responsible for their own choices, and we all need to take ownership of our individual lifestyle decisions.

Since then I’ve been blazing my own healthy trail, which means that I’ve been on the receiving end of this kind of healthy living criticism, and while I don’t believe that people do it maliciously, after a while it does get pretty old.

So in the video below I’m sharing three strategies that you can use to minimize these sorts of experiences, which will allow you to eat what you want, when you want, without feeling judged OR making other people too uncomfortable.

Once you’ve had a chance to watch I’d love to hear from you. So stick around and join in the discussion at the bottom of the page.

What To Do When People Criticize Your Healthy Lifestyle


Now I’d love to hear from you!

Have you ever felt shunned for making healthy lifestyle changes? How did you handle it? Let me know by leaving a comment below.


With love,

sweet potato brownies | Jennifer Dene

Sweet Potato Brownies: A Tasty Sugar Free Treat

Today’s recipe for sweet potato brownies will be a hit with even the most finicky of eaters. If you think that brownies can’t be healthy, or healthy food can’t be delicious, think again!

Last week I told you about the new 21 day eating plan that I started, you can catch up on that here. I’m eight days in and all is going well so far. I’m inspired to be more creative in the kitchen — something that you’ll benefit from in a moment — and I’m spending more time on non-food related lifestyle stuff.

There is one thing though…in a cruel twist of irony, Nate and I attended a sourdough bread making class the day before this all began. So in my freezer are two delicious loaves of organic, heirloom grain, homemade bread. How’s that for bad timing?!

I’ve also noticed that it’s much easier to stick to my menu when my husband isn’t at home. He travelled for the first part of last week, and I didn’t give my food a second thought. The night he returned home, however, I was suddenly missing that glass of wine and bowl of pasta.

This reminded me that food is a social beast, and breaking bread with those you love is a legitimate way of feeding the soul. You CAN be healthy and eat really well, without giving up everything you love.

That’s not to say that I’m obsessing over food or feeling resentful of this experiment. As I mentioned last week, this is a very finite and specific arrangement. And while I’m definitely noticing some positive health boosts, I also realized that I wouldn’t be ok to deprive myself of foods that I love (and that love me back) for a lesser cause…like losing those last five pounds.

Fortunately, I have some fantastic recipes to fall back on, which are gluten free, sugar free, caffeine free, dairy free and grain free. (It’s ok, they’re not “fun” free!) I thought I’d share some of them with you over the next few weeks.

Today’s recipe is for sugar-free sweet potato brownies. These tasty, fudgy-wudgy little morsels will fool even the fussiest of eaters. They’re also easy to make, only require a couple of ingredients, and they freeze really well.

The Benefits Of Sweet Potato Brownies

  • Sweet potatoes are a great source of vitamins A, C & B6, as well as manganese and copper. They’re also rich in potassium, dietary fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and phosphorus. All that’s to say that sweet potatoes are a healthy carb to add to your diet, that help to heal inflammation in the body.
  • Many other “healthy” dessert recipes rely on ingredients like dates, maple syrup, agave and raw nuts. While these foods are ok in moderation, and they’re still better than noshing on a snickers bar, we can’t deny that sugar is sugar, and for many people nuts are really hard to digest. These brownies are gentle on your belly in fact, they’re good for your belly — and they are sweetened with stevia, which doesn’t impact your blood sugar.
  • Finally, if you eat these brownies cold they are a good source of resistant starch (RS3), which feeds the healthy bacteria in your gut.

Resistant starch? Huh?

Resistant starch is a type of dietary fiber found in starchy foods such as potatoes, grains and beans, once they’ve been cooked and cooled. As an undigestible form of fiber, resistant starch moves through the digestive tract without the carbohydrate ever entering your bloodstream. Once it hits the large intestine resistant starch gets fermented, turning it into a prebiotic that feeds the healthy gut flora (i.e. microbiome). The resistant starch in a sweet potato is only activated once that potato has been cooked and cooled; this occurs through a process called retrogradation, which changes the cell structure of the carbohydrate.

A public service warning…

These bad boys are good for you, but they are still treats and should be eaten in moderation!

Sweet Potato Brownies

Melissa Ambrosini created the original recipe; I’ve pared it back and made the method even more simple.


  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 4 tablespoons each: coconut oil & butter
  • 4 organic eggs
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup cacao powder (or carob for caffeine free)
  • 40 drops vanilla stevia
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of sea salt


  1. Preheat oven to 325ºF / 140°C.
  2. Halve the sweet potato lengthways, then press it back together and wrap it in foil like a burrito. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until soft.
  3. Once cooked, scoop out the sweet potato flesh using a spoon. Blend the sweet potato, coconut oil and butter, until smooth.
  4. Add the remaining ingredients to the blender and mix until smooth.
  5. Line baking tray or pan of your choice with parchment paper.
  6. Pour in brownie batter.
  7. Bake for 20-30 minutes (a longer time gives a firmer texture, while shorter is more soft and gooey).
  8. Allow to cool and then cut into small squares (about 15 pieces). Store then in the fridge or freezer.

I hope that you’ll give this recipe a try this week, and do let me know how you go.

With love,


How To Make Hardboiled Eggs

In today’s post we’re going back to basics in the kitchen with a quick tutorial on how to make hardboiled eggs. Already eggscellent at this technique? Watch the video anyway to learn what kind of eggs you should be buying and a super nifty way to peel them.

Growing up I wasn’t much of an egg fan, preferring sweet over savory for breakfast (and sometimes that’s still the case). When I did eat them they had to be cooked within an inch of their life — I’m talking rock solid yolks, no wobble allowed.

But I liked the idea of liking eggs. It seemed to me a rather grown up thing to do, ordering poached eggs on sourdough for breakfast, so I decided to get on board with this egg eating thing once and for all.

And that’s where my love of hardboiled eggs started, probably because I could control the “wobble factor”.

Of course there are better reasons for eating eggs, ones that extend further than feeling grown up at a cafe. Such as:

  • Eggs contain all of the essential amino acids and a host of nutrients such as vitamin A, many B vitamins, selenium, phosphorus and folate
  • With six grams of protein per egg they help with weight loss and muscle repair
  • Plus new research (1) suggests that you can absorb nine times more nutrients when you eat whole eggs with raw vegetables.

Of course you get these benefits no matter how you cook them (as long as you keep the egg intact that is, no more egg white scrambles please). I rotate between hardboiled, poached and scrambled, but I find the former the easiest to have on hand for adding to breakfasts, salads and snacks.

So don your aprons and pop into the kitchen as we whip ourselves up a batch of hardboiled eggs.

(Psst: before you watch the video I have to apologize about the audio. The mic wasn’t working for the first half so it sounds a little strange…this is what happens when you leave a trainer and home cook in charge of video creation!)

How To Make Hardboiled Eggs

Choose the number of eggs you’d like to make and select a saucepan that’s large enough for them all (keep in mind that they keep in the fridge for 4 – 5 days)

  1. Place eggs in the saucepan, cover with cold water, add the lid
  2. Bring water to the boil and then immediately turn off heat
  3. Leave the eggs in the saucepan for 7 – 10 minutes (depending on your personal wobble-tolerance)
  4. Then remove the eggs and place them in a bowl of cold water – this stops them from cooking further
  5. Once cooled you can store them in a bowl in the fridge, or peel them using my spoon technique, which you can see at 2:02 in the video

Here Are Two Simple Egg Recipes You May Want To Try

Eggs & Avo On Toast

Not really a recipe so much as an idea: Toast a slice of bread. Spread some sliced avocado on top. Add a chopped egg, salt, red pepper flakes (optional) and maybe a squeeze of lime. Yum!

Mayo Free Egg Salad

Whisk together juice from 1/2 a lemon, 1 teaspoon dijon mustard and 1 tablespoon tahini (sesame seed paste). Add a little water if mixture is too thick. Add (chopped): 4 hardboiled eggs, 2 celery stalks, 1/4 green apple, 1/4 red onion, italian parsley. Mix it all together, season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve over greens with a side of rye bread.

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

On a scale of 1 – 10 (1 being almost raw and 10 being rock hard) how cooked do you like your yolks? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

More Sunday Prep Ideas

Low Sugar Bircher Muesli

Flour Free Banana Pancakes

Work With Me 1:1

I have new spaces available in my 1:1 coaching program. It’s virtual (we hang out via Skype or phone) and 100% customized to suit your lifestyle. If you’re interested, or know someone who might be, please email to schedule your free consultation.

Until next time keep being fit, feminine & fabulous!


JDW Signature

Flour-Free Pancakes

Flour-Free Pancakes: A Five Ingredient Recipe

Today’s recipe for flour-free pancakes is going to blow your socks off!

I’m including it in our Sunday Prep Series as I like to make a batch on the weekend and nibble on them throughout the week. You might decide to go all in and devour them for Sunday brunch. Whatever floats your boat.

I’ve spoken with many of you about what kind of recipes you would like to see on JDW. The verdict? Recipes that are quick, simple to prepare, use the least number of ingredients, and are healthy but still tasty. 

Got it!

With that in mind I wanted to remind you to download your free copy of  The Healthy Living Made Easy Menu

It includes five delicious recipes that can be prepared on the weekend and quickly served up throughout the week.

The Menu Includes:

  1. Grilled white fish with quinoa, asparagus, and peach & avocado salsa
  2. A loaded “taco” sweet potato
  3. Grass-fed beef burger salad with polenta wedges
  4. Cheat’s teriyaki chicken
  5. Mini ricotta and berry cheesecakes

Click here to download your free week.

Moving on to today’s recipe — Flour-free pancakes made with banana, coconut, eggs and blueberries.

Jennifer Dene Wellness is not a Paleo website, I don’t believe in no-carb diets (heck, I don’t believe in any kind of diets), and I don’t think that gluten is the enemy, if your stomach can digest it.

But the reality is that traditional pancakes just aren’t that healthy. Not only are pancakes packed with refined flour and sugar — two major players on the “less-is-more” ingredient list — they also don’t offer up enough protein or fiber.

Ever wondered why you get hungry quite quickly after visiting IHOP? Fiber and protein (both missing in classic pancakes) are the key to feeling full, and fueled, after eating.

That’s not to say you can’t ever eat pancakes. You can eat whatever you want. But we need to be honest and admit that they’re just not an “every day food”.

While there are loads of “healthy pancake” recipes on the internet they often use whole-wheat flour, or some kind of nut flour. But that’s just more ingredients for you to buy, and more money for you to spend.

I also don’t love the “swap-flour-for-nut-flour” craze. Nut flours are high in Omega 6 fatty acids, high in calories, and can easily go rancid if not used shortly after grinding. But perhaps that’s a topic for another day.

These pancakes are so easy to prepare— after reading the recipe once you’ll be able to whip them up in your sleep. They also require very few ingredients, and include fiber (bananas), protein (eggs), and healthy fats (coconut)

One Final Tip … 

If you choose to top your pancakes with maple syrup I want you to remember three things:

  1. Buy real maple syrup. The ingredient list should only read maple syrup. Nothing else.
  2. Measure your pour. One tablespoon of maple syrup has 14g of sugar! Gah! If you pour two tablespoons that’s your entire sugar intake reached for the day.
  3. Consider alternatives. Try the pancakes plain, they’re delicious. Or add a berry sauce: Heat 1/2 cup blueberries with 1 tablespoon of water and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small saucepan, or the microwave. Once the berries have softened, and the water is mostly absorbed, pour over your pancakes.

Banana & Coconut Flour-Free Pancakes

(Makes 10 pancakes) (Gluten Free)

Flour-Free Pancakes


  • 3 ripe bananas
  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1 cup blueberries (fresh or thawed if frozen)
  • 2 tsp coconut oil, for frying


  1. Mash the bananas with a fork. Place in a medium-sized bowl and whisk together with the eggs and coconut. Add the blueberries (reserve a few for serving) and stir well.
  2. Heat the coconut oil in a 10in (25cm) non-stick frying pan over a medium hear. Add two to three tablespoons of batter for each pancake. You should be able to fit 3 to 4 pancakes in at a time. Use a spatula to carefully flip the pancakes when they have set and the bottom is golden — about 2 minutes on the first side and 1 minute on the other.
  3. Stack the pancakes and top with reserved blueberries.

This recipe was created by Green Kitchen Stories

Now I’d Love To Hear From You

Are you going to try these pancakes? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

With love,

JDW Signature

P.S. I’m not totally hating on pancakes! Remember the expression: everything in moderation, including moderation.